ready jet go

READY JET GO! is a 3D animated series for 3-8 year-olds with a focus on astronomy, scientific exploration, innovation and invention, and Earth as it is affected by our solar system. The show is about two neighborhood kids-one with an all-consuming drive for science fact and another with an overwhelming passion for science fiction. They both befriend the new kid on their street, Jet Propulsion, whose family happens to be aliens from Bortron 7. The comedy series teaches kids a variety of Earth science concepts (gravity, tides, moon phases, seasons) as well as an introductory explanation of innovation, astronomy, and our solar system.

Showing airdates for Ready Jet Go! from Tuesday, Dec. 6 to Tuesday, Dec. 13

Holidays In Boxwood Terrace

PBS Kids

4:30 amTuesday, Dec. 620224:30:002022-12-06 04:30:00
Show Episode Info

Jet pitches an idea for the annual Boxwood Terrace Christmas Pageant, and not only is it accepted, he gets to direct it! He casts Sean, Sydney, Mindy, and Sunspot as characters in the play, and hires Mitchell Petersen to help him find this elusive thing called "Christmas Spirit." / Jet is looking for the Spirit of Christmas, something intangible that Sean and Sydney can't quite define. Mitchell wants to belong to the group, but doesn't know how to do it. Both kids get their answer in a heartfelt conclusion.

Space Junk/Scientific Sean

PBS Kids

8:30 pmTuesday, Dec. 6202220:30:002022-12-06 20:30:00
Show Episode Info

"Space Junk" - After learning about space junk, the kids are determined to help do their part to clean up their "space neighborhood." They meet up with Uncle Zucchini, a long-time galaxy garbage man! Using Bortronian technology, they start a cleanup. During the course of the day, our kids learn that recycling is necessary both on Earth and in space! Curriculum: The outer space region around Earth swarms with millions of pieces of man-made space junk that create potential hazards. Objects as small as 4 inches can be seen by radar or optical telescopes on Earth. Cleaning the debris is a challenge. Trips to larger objects could remove them from orbit, but that's expensive. Another proposal is using lasers to provide a path-changing push that wouldn't damage the object. "Scientific Sean" - Jet is fascinated by Earth paper airplanes when he watches Sean casually fold one. Jet suggests that the kids challenge each other to build the plane that will fly the farthest, and still carry the payload of a message. Sean wants to use the Scientific Method to solve the distance/size issues. CURRICULUM: The Scientific Method is a simple set of rules that scientists use the world over, to make sure that they are doing their experiments correctly and in a way that they can repeat. But great science comes from both the application of this simple set of rules AND from imagination and inspiration.

Space Junk/Scientific Sean

PBS Kids

4:30 amWednesday, Dec. 720224:30:002022-12-07 04:30:00
Show Episode Info

"Space Junk" - After learning about space junk, the kids are determined to help do their part to clean up their "space neighborhood." They meet up with Uncle Zucchini, a long-time galaxy garbage man! Using Bortronian technology, they start a cleanup. During the course of the day, our kids learn that recycling is necessary both on Earth and in space! Curriculum: The outer space region around Earth swarms with millions of pieces of man-made space junk that create potential hazards. Objects as small as 4 inches can be seen by radar or optical telescopes on Earth. Cleaning the debris is a challenge. Trips to larger objects could remove them from orbit, but that's expensive. Another proposal is using lasers to provide a path-changing push that wouldn't damage the object. "Scientific Sean" - Jet is fascinated by Earth paper airplanes when he watches Sean casually fold one. Jet suggests that the kids challenge each other to build the plane that will fly the farthest, and still carry the payload of a message. Sean wants to use the Scientific Method to solve the distance/size issues. CURRICULUM: The Scientific Method is a simple set of rules that scientists use the world over, to make sure that they are doing their experiments correctly and in a way that they can repeat. But great science comes from both the application of this simple set of rules AND from imagination and inspiration.

Diggin' Earth/Mindy's Mystery

PBS Kids

8:30 pmWednesday, Dec. 7202220:30:002022-12-07 20:30:00
Show Episode Info

"Diggin' Earth" - The kids try to dig into the Center of the Earth (a la Commander Cressida), but after finding out that the center is much too hot and the layer of Earth leading up to it is solid rock, they re-vamp their plans. They decide to become the kids to dig down the deepest into the Earth. Learning about the layers of the Earth inspires Jet to make an Earth Layer Cake. Curriculum: Earth's structure consists of molten nickel-iron core, magma mantle, and crust. The reason we can't easily dig down through to the core is because the Earth's crust is 10-30 miles thick! And made of really hard rock. Inside of that is the mantle. The core is nickel and iron, the heaviest stuff, which gravity pulls to the center. In fact, it gets so hot in the core that even the nickel and iron melt. "Mindy's Mystery" - Mindy can't sleep one night, having been kept awake by a sweet, strong smell from outside. Sydney, Sean, Jet, and Sunspot become detectives and try to crack the case of the sweet smell. At the same time, Mitchell is investigating what kept him up last night - a very bright "annoying" light. In the end, there's a common source - the sweet smell was from a nocturnal flower, the Moonflower, which only blooms at night, after sundown. And the bright light was from the Moon! Curriculum: Moonflowers are nocturnal bloomers. After sunset as the Moon rises, these huge white flowers bloom, emit a very sweet smell, and glow in the moonlight. In the morning, they close their fragrant blooms. Moonflowers' scent attracts the night moths that feed on their nectar. Moonlight doesn't originate on the Moon. The Moon (like the planets) shines by reflected Sunlight. The Sun, of course, only lights up 1/2 of the Moon - the half that is facing the Sun.

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